Rob Gorrell - Folk Artist

Get your lanterns now. It will be dark soon.

folk art

A Big lantern for a Mason friend.

Tinware, UncategorizedRob GorrellComment

My friend Bill has been wanting me to make him one of my large parade lanterns (AKA party beacon) for quite a while.  He wanted several different masonic themed panels along with his gunsmithing notice.  Unfortunately I could not figure out a way to get all that information tin punched onto the lantern without it looking like an odd star chart.  So we talked more about it and simplified the design to one repeated image with his initials added. This lantern was an interesting challenge and was fun to make.  I look forward to seeing it lit up outside Bill's camp at an upcoming event.

 

Mason party beacon

Here is what it will look  like at night, minus the blur I hope.

 Mason party beacon night.

This lantern design is my interpretation of an 1830's parade lantern that is part of the Winterthur Museum collection.

 

A new red colonial lantern.

Tinware, UncategorizedRob GorrellComment
I have started playing around with painted finishes on some of my tinware.  It would be nice to be able to reproduce original paints, but so far most of the formulas for period paints that will stick to metal are pretty toxic. But I am still looking.

This lantern was painted with a few layers and colors of paint, and heated in an oven to get the final finish.

You can see more images in my Etsy Store.

 

 

Monkeys on a Weathervane? I call it "King of the Hill".

Folk Art, Painted Folk Art, Tramp Art, WhittlingRob GorrellComment

For some reason the other day I got to thinking about the old "Barrel full of Monkeys" that we played with as kids. Did you have a set? It was a pretty simple toy, but fun.  At the same time I was thinking about the series of folk art weather vanes that I am working on in the shop. So here is how my mind tends to work sometimes. I am thinking of a new weather vane design and about monkeys, so the obvious conclusion is that I need to make a weather vane full of monkeys. Right? So I did.

Cutting out some of the planning steps, I ended up with a pile of monkey shaped blanks of basswood. I was going to hand-carve each of the monkeys, but decided to save time and effort and power carve them into vague, monkey-influenced shapes.

It was at about this point that I started thinking about how the monkeys would be climbing over each other to get to the top of the weather vane. Would the top monkeys be pulling the others up, or kicking them off the heap? Were the monkeys working cooperatively to achieve the summit, or were they trying to jerk the top monkey off of the peak? I did not know yet.

After loosely carving the monkeys I set them aside and worked on the copper weather vane parts. For the arrow and tail I used some salvaged copper sheet that I had in the shop.  Once the copper was shaped and soldered into shape I worked on the layout of the monkeys. Thank goodness for zip ties and wires. Getting wooden monkeys to fit neatly on a weather vane turned out to be quite a challenge.

Skipping forward again, I finished carving and painting the monkeys and fastened them together using a variety of techniques to get them under control.  For the base I used part of a salvaged pine beam, an old spool of some sort and a few chip carved pieces of a shipping crate.  A few layers of paint, some antiquing of the copper and I called it done.

King of the hill weather vane

In the end I decided the monkey on top was a mean looking dude and is trying to dominate the other monkeys. Maybe I'm just in a mood, but that is the way I see it. What do you think? [polldaddy poll=6717789]

I have listed this creation in my Etsy Store if you are interested in purchasing King of the Hill for your collection.

Repairing a tin lantern.

Folk Art, TinwareRob Gorrell1 Comment

I have been doing a lot of reading about coopering and tinware lately and trying to learn the techniques myself.  One area that I have found very interesting is in the repair of tinware, buckets and other handmade items.  I think sometimes it is easy to get caught up in the idea that every handmade item produced in the pre-industrial period was flawless, and that we should only present perfect reproductions. But not every tinsmith was an expert.  There were people cranking out crap then just like today, the difference being that the crap wore out and some of the really good stuff survived. And they fixed stuff.  I don't have the reference handy, but there are lots of documented repairs that have made it own to modern times.  So in that spirit, here is how I repaired a tin lantern that I made.

Last winter I made two tin lanterns for us to use at reenactments and living history events. We used them a few times and they worked pretty well, until one of the rivets came loose and the handle fell off.  Well actually I guess I should say that the lantern fell off the handle to be more accurate.  You can see here where one of the rivets pulled through the hole. It turns out that I used the wrong rivets, which were also too long.

So I cut out a heavy piece of hot dipped tin plate and curved it to ft over a wood mandrel. I also punch a proper hole for a new rivet.

Next, I cut a small washer for the inside of the handle, then riveted the washer, handle, and curved plate together.

The final step was to solder the assembly back onto the lantern.

So the lantern is now good as new.  Maybe not perfect, but fully functional.