Rob Gorrell - Folk Artist

It's going to get dark, do you have your lantern?

Working up a pattern for an unusual lantern.

Rob GorrellComment

I am always looking through books and websites looking for more information on period lanterns.  I don't know what it is exactly about lanterns that interests me so much, but I have been making a bunch of them lately.

I came across this lantern in the online collection of the Winterthur Museum and had to try to figure it out. It had two doors, a tube on the back (extra candle?) and a storage area on the bottom.  The original has horn panes.  The museum dates this lantern to 1800-1850. 

 

Courtesy, Winterthur Museum, Lantern, 1800-1850,United States, Tinned sheet iron, Horn, Iron, paint, Bequest of Henry Francis DuPont, 1965.2836.

Courtesy, Winterthur Museum, Lantern, 1800-1850,United States, Tinned sheet iron, Horn, Iron, paint, Bequest of Henry Francis DuPont, 1965.2836.

My lantern is an interpretation on the original, not an exact reproduction.  I used mica for the panes, but am working on getting horn replacements made. There were a few items on this design that were new to me and I hope to make improvements on the next attempt.  For example, the skinny lower door was difficult to get hinged properly and came out a little longer than the upper door, also, getting the three vent cones on the top scaled  out for cutting took a few tries.

   

 

 

The original lantern is painted black, but I antiqued this lantern. i will probably use asphaltum on the next one. If I remember to do it, I will take photos of the construction process next time.

I would be very glad to hear comments or suggestions to improve this design.

I am looking forward to trying this out at our next living history event.   

Special thanks to Susan Newton at Winterthur Museum for her assistance.